don’t be a stalker rigby

lego-joker:

Gallery Walk: Jim Aparo’s Joker.

I’ve wanted to compile a gallery walk series of the Bat-villains for a while now, but was stymied at what format it would be. Some artists have drawn a huge variety of Bat-villains, while others have drawn very, very few - few enough that it would make more sense for the gallery walk to focus on the villain instead and showcase the different artists who have worked on him/her.

In the end, I decided to do an all-of-the-above sort of thing, changing up the formula as circumstances dictate. This walk in particular, however, will probably be the only one to focus on a specific artist and a specific character.

When it comes to Batman artists, I legitimately don’t know if there are any whose volume of work actually surpasses Jim Aparo’s (Bob Kane’s legion of ghost artists might count, but only if they’re all lumped into one giant bloc). Aparo’s been in the game since the ’70s, and his work stretched all the way into the 2000s, ceasing only a few years before his tragic death. As for the Joker… well, he’s self-explanatory, isn’t he? A villain of his popularity has probably been drawn by every Batman artist worth his/her salt at least once.

The above isn’t close to all the times that Aparo’s drawn the Joker; there are quite a few stories/covers that I intentionally left out, probably a few more that I legitimately forgot about, and that’s not even counting all the stuff he’s been asked to do at conventions and the like. Still, I hope I’ve complied an adequate timeline of how Aparo’s Joker evolved over the years.

Images are as follows:

Fig. 1: To my knowledge, the first time Aparo drew the Joker was in The Brave and the Bold #111 (1974). The story in question, “Death Has the Last Laugh!”, is notable as one of the most brutal Joker stories of the Bronze Age - seriously, in this one, Joker casually offs an entire family in the first page, and he demonstrates absolutely no personality throughout the story aside from an all-consuming desire to kill Batman.

Fig. 2: A charming little cover from 1977’s Batman #294, the final part to “Where Were You The Night Batman Was Killed?”. The Joker’s decidedly tamer in this one, though he does pull out a gadget that’s pretty damn horrifying when applied to human flesh.

Fig. 3: The Untold Legend of the Batman #2 (1980). The first time that Aparo’s done the Joker’s origin. Quite nice.

Fig. 4: The Brave and the Bold #191 (1982). A much more lighthearted Batman/Joker teamup, with the Penguin thrown in for good measure. This one’s become something of a cult classic in recent years, I believe - its cover even got a cameo in the Brave and the Bold TV show’s episode “Emperor Joker!”.

Fig. 5: Batman #426-429 (1988). Yep. I can’t really devote a post to Aparo and the Joker without referencing “A Death in the Family”, no matter how much I want to. The story is ugly, dated, and exploitative, and even Aparo’s art suffers a tad (maybe because this is the first story in the lineup that Aparo didn’t ink himself). Still, the iconic crowbar scene does maintain a surreal, grotesque sort of charm.

Fig. 6: Batman #450-451 (1990). The better-than-it-has-any-right-to-be sequel to “A Death in the Family”, which refreshingly features one of the most vulnerable and all-around human Jokers I’ve read in any era. No, he’s not suddenly a boy scout, but it’s nice to see someone reference the fact that homicidal criminal mastermind or not, getting shot fucking hurts. Also features Aparo recreating several key scenes from The Killing Joke, if you go for that kind of thing.

Fig. 7: Legends of the Dark Knight Annual #1 (1991). Like a lot of Batman annuals, this one’s mostly an excuse for a bunch of new hotshot artists (including an early-bird Ty Templeton!) to try their hand at drawing Batman. But the framing device, delivered by old hands Aparo and Denny O’Neil and centered around an age-old question between Batman and the Joker, is serviceable enough.

Fig. 8: 1993 was a very big year for Batman, and I think all of you know why. Yes, it was the year of “Knightfall” - the storyline where the Joker and Scarecrow teamed up for the first time and spent most of it crashing in the mayor’s mansion and scarfing down junk food! Also, some asshole called Bane broke Batman’s spine, so there’s that.

Fig. 9: Batman Villains Secret Files and Origins (1997). Hey, it might be a swipe from Brian Bolland, but if you’re gonna swipe, swipe from the best.

Fig. 10: Legends of the Dark Knight #142-145 (2001). I don’t remember clearly, but this might have in fact been Aparo’s last Batman work - and what better way to mark it than by teaming up Batman’s two greatest foes? Though, as Chuck Dixon-penned Joker stories go, I’ve read better, and according to Dixon, the hideous inking here was added years after the story had actually been completed. The kicker? Apparently, the story had previously been inked by Graham Nolan, only it was shelved for some reason and then re-inked when they finally pulled it out. There is no justice in this world.

"Nobody lays a hand on my partner while I’m around!"

(Urge to make gay joke rises)

(Sees panel showing Batman and Joker in a Turkish bathhouse together)

(Urge becomes unbearable)

ifyouresosmart:

…$14

$25.50. That fight I got into once in elementary school really skewed the results.
…Wait, is skinny-dipping defined only as “swimming naked with someone else”, or does swimming naked by yourself in a backyard pool count? Fuck it. $20.50.

ifyouresosmart:

…$14

$25.50. That fight I got into once in elementary school really skewed the results.

…Wait, is skinny-dipping defined only as “swimming naked with someone else”, or does swimming naked by yourself in a backyard pool count? Fuck it. $20.50.

thewarmind:

sadvaporwavebabe:

friendly reminder that ╮(─▽─)╭

we*boo is a slur (◡‿◡✿)

it dehumanizes otherkin who identify as fictional characters from japanese cartoons (anime) (⇀‸↼‶)

dont call me a we*boo im a FICTIVEKIN who happens to identify as someone who speaks japanese (ノಠ益ಠ)ノ彡┻━┻

image

"Gloomgender and aesthetgender"

lileks:

Good parents make sure their kids get enough sugar every day. This message brought to you by the utterly impartial and non-industry connected Sugar Information, Inc. 

lileks:

Good parents make sure their kids get enough sugar every day. This message brought to you by the utterly impartial and non-industry connected Sugar Information, Inc. 

justinchan:

GUNGODA!

justinchan:

GUNGODA!

lego-joker:

askgoodolmothy:

How is it possible to both try way too hard to appear funny and self-referential, yet at the same time, obviously not be trying hard enough?

This is still probably the best DCnU Harley we’ve gotten so far, though.

She’s smiling right at the fourth wall in that final panel. She might as well have a little wink afterwards.

And why shouldn’t she? I mean, nothing’s better than poking gentle fun at your editorial hierarchy via dated, lukewarm puns, am I right? Jim Lee’s ballcap says “FDNY LA”! It’s brilliant because they moved their headquarters! Comic genius!

why-i-love-comics:

Harley Quinn #8 - “Pies in the Skies”

Written by Amanda Conner & Jimmy Palmiotti
Art by Chad Hardin

How is it possible to both try way too hard to appear funny and self-referential, yet at the same time, obviously not be trying hard enough?

nonsolokawaii:

Booboo and her friends | via

blorgblorgblorg:

ryanccole:

This picture and those words are giving me opinions.
mean ones D:

"this is not a campy or meta version of scooby doo"
then why even bother at this point

It looks like David Reddick’s art, but somehow even more boring and generic.

blorgblorgblorg:

ryanccole:

This picture and those words are giving me opinions.

mean ones D:

"this is not a campy or meta version of scooby doo"

then why even bother at this point

It looks like David Reddick’s art, but somehow even more boring and generic.

"And make sure she’s not quite of legal age!" - Also Phil Robertson

"And make sure she’s not quite of legal age!" - Also Phil Robertson

bumblebros:

This is egregious bullshit.

martianmanboobies:

Stop. WW has been around since the early 1940s and has worn warrior-style leather skirts on and off since then. Xena is from the 90s. The new costume is not a Xena rip-off. They don’t even look that similar. If anything, Xena looks like Diana, not the other way around. The stupid shit people come up with to undermine DC…yeesh.

Well, yeah, I know the history of the costume, but it’s the fact that it’s so washed-out and brown, just like everything else in these movies, that I have a problem with. Look at those examples from the comics - the vibrant colours are what help keep it from just looking like a generic sword-and-sandals leather/bronze ensemble. People wouldn’t be making so many Xena comparisons in the first place if there weren’t so many damn muted tones in this franchise.

Don’t you “yeesh” me.

tompeyer:

Constantly exhaling to keep his feet off the ground

[His nostrils expand to the size of manhole covers]
"NOBODY SUSPECTS A THING"

tompeyer:

Constantly exhaling to keep his feet off the ground

[His nostrils expand to the size of manhole covers]

"NOBODY SUSPECTS A THING"